BIRDS OF NEW ENGLAND AND EASTERN NEW YORK - HOFFMANN

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STARLINGS : FAMILY STURNIDÆ

[EUROPEAN] STARLING. Sturnus vulgaris
8.50 in.

Ad. ♂ in summer.— Entire body black, with green and purple reflections; each feather of the back tipped with grayish-yellow; bill yellow. Ad. ♀.— Plumage less brilliant; buffy spots larger, especially below. Ad. in winter.— Spotting much more conspicuous; light brown on upper parts, and whitish on under parts; bill blackish. Im.— Grayish-brown.

Nest, in hollow trees, or in crevices in buildings. Eggs, pale greenish-blue or bluish-white.

The Starling has been introduced from Europe into Central Park, and has not only become well established there, but has spread to New Jersey, Staten Island, and along Long Island Sound. It is resident throughout the year. Starlings feed on the ground, where they walk after the manner of our blackbirds. In late summer and autumn they collect in flocks, which in Europe blacken the sky; they now resort to the reeds in low ground. The male sings in early spring from the top of a tree, or on some building; some of the notes are very sweet, others are harsh, and many are imitations of the surrounding noises.


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