BIRDS OF NEW ENGLAND AND EASTERN NEW YORK - HOFFMANN

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SHORE BIRDS: ORDER LIMICOLÆ
[ORDER CHARADRIIFORMES]

TURNSTONES: FAMILY APHRIZIDÆ

RUDDY TURNSTONE. Arenaria morinella
9.50 in.

Ad.— Top of head grayish-white; breast and line about eye black; back and wings warm reddish-brown, mottled with black; three stripes of white on the back showing in flight; white showing in wings in flight; legs red. Im.— Upper parts brown, streaked with gray; lower back, wings, and tail in flight, similar to adult; sides of throat and breast dark brown; rest of under parts white.

The Turnstone is a not uncommon migrant along the seacoast in May, and again in August and September, feeding on the outer beaches either in small flocks by itself or in company with Ring-necks [Semipalmated Plover], Sanderling, and "Peep” [Least Sanpiper]. It may readily be distinguished from any of these species by its size (it is larger than a Ring-neck) and by its striking colors. In the adult plumage, the black breast, rich reddish-brown back, and red feet are very noticeable when it is feeding, and when it flies the display of white, formed by stripes down the middle and sides of the back and along the wings, makes a striking pattern. The young birds may be known by the same pattern of white which shows in flight. The Turnstone's call-note is a chuckling whistle.


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